Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting: Replace Old Machine or Not

Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting: Replace Old Machine or Not

One year ago, your company purchased a machine used in manufacturing for $110,000. You have learned that a new machine is available that offers many advantages; you can purchase it for $150,000 today. It will be depreciated on a straight-line basis over 10 years, after which it has no salvage value. You expect that the new machine will produce EBITDA (Earnings Before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) of $40,000 per year for the next 10 years. The current machine is expected to produce EBITDA of $20,000 per year. The current machine is being depreciated on a straight-line basis over a useful life of 11 years, after which it will have no salvage value, so depreciation expense for the current machine is $10,000 per year. All other expenses of the two machines are identical. The market value today of the current machine is $50,000. Your company’s tax rate is 45%, and the opportunity cost of capital for this type of equipment is 10%. Is it profitable to replace the year-old machine?

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Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting: Percolated Fiber Free Cash Flow

Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting: Percolated Fiber Free Cash Flow in $1.50 only (Instant Download)

You are a manager at Percolated Fiber, which is considering expanding its operations in synthetic fiber manufacturing. Your boss comes into your office, drops a consultant’s report on your desk, and complains, “We owe these consultants $1 million for this report, and I am not sure their analysis makes sense. Before we spend the $25 million on new equipment needed for this project, look it over and give me your opinion.” You open the report and find the following estimates (in millions of dollars):

All of the estimates in the report seem correct. You note that the consultants used straight-line depreciation for the new equipment that will be purchased today (year 0), which is what the accounting department recommended. The report concludes that because the project will increase earnings by $4.875 million per year for ten years, the project is worth $48.75 million. You think back to your halcyon days in finance class and realize there is more work to be done!

Top Switch Inc.:Calculate cost in the Raw Materials, Work in Process, and Finished Goods Inventory

SMU School of Accountancy

Top Switch Inc.:Calculate cost in the Raw Materials, Work in Process, and Finished Goods Inventory in US$ 8 only                         (Instant Download)

Top Switch Inc. designs and manufactures switches used in telecommunications. Serious flooding throughout the state of Tennessee affected Top Switch’s facilities. Inventory was completely ruined, and the company’s computer system, including all accounting records, was destroyed.

Before the unfortunate incident, recovery specialists cleaned the buildings. The company controller is very nervous and anxious to recover whatever records he can to support the insurance claim for the destroyed inventory. After consulting with the cost accountant, they decide to retrieve the previous year’s annual report for the beginning inventory numbers. In addition, they also agreed that they need first quarter cost data.

The cost accountant was working on the first quarter results before the storm hit, and to his surprise, the report was still in his desk drawer. After reviewing the data , the information shows the following information: Material purchases were $ 325,000; Direct Labor was $ 220,000. Further discussions between the controller and the cost accountant revealed that sales were $ 1,350,000 and the gross margin was 30% of sales. The cost accountant also discovered, while sifting through the information, that cost of goods available for sale was $ 1,020,000 at cost. While assessing the damage, the controller determined that the prime costs were $ 545,000 up to the time of the damage and that manufacturing overhead is 65% of conversion cost. The cost accountant is not sure about all of this, but he decides to see what he can do with the information.

ACC 230 Week 7: Nortel Networks Case (Checkpoint)

Many high-technology companies, like Nortel Networks, Micron Technology and JDS Uniphase, have written down massive amounts of their inventory. For example, Nortel Networks revalued some of its inventory parts at $0, though the inventory initially cost Nortel $650 million. Companies are required to report whether they write off the cost value (or book value) or their inventory even if they do not dispose of the inventory. Later on, they may sell this inventory but are not required to report the sale for cash of previously “worthless” inventory. The effect may be that in future years, when the inventory is sold, profits are overstated. Also in the article, JDS Uniphase said it will write off $250 million of its inventory but promised to disclose any future sale. On the other hand, Micron Technology, which wrote down $260 million, won’t disclose any future sale (Krantz, 2001). Should the Securities and Exchange Commission do anything? Why?

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Question on Elimination Entry etc

Historical financial statement

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At the end of the year 2003, a parent sold equipment to a wholly owned subsidiary for $32,000. The equipment cost the parent $100,000 and, at the date of the inter company sale, had accumulated depreciation of $60,000 and a four-year remaining life. Both the subsidiary and the parent use straight line depreciation and assume no salvage value. The subsidiary plans to depreciate the asset over the equipment’s remaining four-year life.

Required:

A) Prepare the elimination entry or entries required on the consolidation work papers used to prepare a complete set of financial statements for the years 2003 and 2004.

B) Compute the amounts that would appear in the year 2005 consolidated balance sheet for the equipment and related accumulated depreciation.

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