Mini Case: The Power to Cool Off in Florida (Indiantown Cogeneration Project)

Tabebuia caraiba. Jensen Beach, Martin County,...

CFM3 Ch 10 Minicase The Power to Cool Off in Florida in $19 only

Objective:
This case demonstrates the use of NPV, IRR, and financial ratios for evaluating a capital budgeting project.
Case Discussion:
The Indiantown Cogeneration Project involved the construction and operation of a coal-fired plant in Martin County, Florida, that produces electricity and steam. The capital cost (including interest during construction) was approximately $770 million. Since completion, it has an electric generating capacity of 330 megawatts (net) and a steam capacity of 175,000 pounds per hour. The project sells the electric power to Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) under a 30-year contract and the steam to Caulkins Indiantown Citrus Company under a 15-year contract.

FPL’s electricity payments have two parts: one for electric capacity and the other for the electric energy that it receives.

The project’s financing consisted of $630 million of 30-year 9% APR interest rate debt and $140 million of equity. The debt requires equal annual sinking fund payments of $31.5 million beginning in year 11. Depreciation is straight line to zero over 20 years. The tax rate is 40%. Other information about the project includes:

Mini Case: Getting Off the Ground at Boeing

CFM3 Ch 09 Mini Case: Getting Off the Ground at Boeing in $9 only

Objective:

This case asks the student to calculate the incremental cash flows and use the NPV and IRR methods to evaluate Boeing’s investment project to build a new plane. This project, because of its size and importance to Boeing, was potentially a “make-or-break” investment for the firm. It was therefore critical to Boeing to “get it right” when it performed the capital budgeting analysis.

Case Discussion:
By the time Boeing announced the newest addition to its fleet, much of the preliminary work was already computed. The new plane was an enormous undertaking. Research and development, begun two and a half years earlier, would cost between $4 billion and $5 billion. Production facilities and personnel training would require an additional investment of $2.0 billion, and $1.7 billion in working capital would be required. The exhibit included in the case furnishes profit, depreciation, and capital expenditure projections for the project.

Cost of Capital and Weighted Average Cost of Capital

Calculate the after-tax cost of a $25 million debt issue that Pullman Manufacturing Corporation (40% marginal taxrate) is planning to place privately with a large insurance company. This long-term issue will yield 6.6% to the insurance company.

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Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) for Golden Gate construction Associates

Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) for Golden Gate construction Associates

Golden Gate Construction Associates, a real estate developer and building contractor in San Francisco, has two sources of long-term capital: debt

and equity. The cost to Golden Gate of issuing debt is the after-tax cost of the interest payments on the debt, taking into account the fact that the interest payments are tax deductible. The cost of Golden Gate’s equity capital is the investment opportunity rate of Golden Gate’s investors, that is, the rate they could earn on investments of similar risk to that of investing in Golden Gate Construction Associates. The interest rate on Golden Gate’s $90 million of long-term debt is 10 percent, and the company’s tax rate is 40 percent. The cost of Golden Gate’s equity capital is 15 percent. Moreover, the market value (and book value) of Golden Gate’s equity is $135 million. Required: Calculate Golden Gate Construction Associates’ weighted-average cost of capital

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Questions on Cost of Capital, WACC and IPO

Questions on Cost of Capital

Questions on Cost of Capital, WACC and IPO for $3 Only
1. What are the main elements in calculating cost of capital? How would an increase in debt affect the cost of capital? How would you identify the optimal cost of capital for an organization?
2. What is meant by Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC)? Why is WACC a more appropriate discount rate when doing capital budgeting? What is the impact on WACC when an organization needs to raise long term capital?
3. What is an Initial Public Offering (IPO)? How does an IPO allow an organization to grow financially? When is a merger or an acquisition, rather than an IPO, a more appropriate way to grow?

Each answer should be 150-300 words.

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FIN200

Final Project Overview in $50 Only

FIN200

As students of finance and potential investors, you can estimate the financial health and profitability of a company using financial ratios and other industry tools. The tools and skills practiced in this course can be used to help you determine whether or not to invest money in a company. Research into the financial health of the company can help make the decision.

In the final project, you compute corporate performance ratios and compare them to industry averages. You also study portions of the company’s annual report to analyze the company’s operating and cash cycles, long-term debt, and cost of capital. Finally, you summarize your conclusions in an analysis from an investor perspective. Please summarize and explain the project listed in the syllabus here.

Final Project Timeline

Cost of Capital Mini Case: Cascade Water Company

English: Cost-Volume-Profit diagram, decomposi...

Source Book : Corporate Finance: Linking Theory to What Companies Do By John Graham, Scott B. Smart, William L. Megginson

Chapter 9: Cost of Capital and Project Risk

Mini Case

Cascade Water Company (CWC) currently has 30,000,000 shares of common stock out- standing that trade at a price of $42 per share. CWC also has 500,000 bonds outstanding that currently trade at $923.38 each. CWC has no preferred stock outstanding and has an equity beta of 2.639. The risk-free rate is 3.5%, and the market is expected to return 12.52%. The firm’s bonds have a 20-year life, a $1,000 par value, a 10% coupon rate and pay interest semi-annually.

CWC is considering adding to its product mix a “healthy” bottled water geared toward children. The initial outlay for the project is expected to be $3,000,000, which will be depreciated using the straight-line method to a zero salvage value, and sales are expected to be 1,250,000 units per year at a price of $1.25 per unit. Variable costs are estimated to be $0.24 per unit, and fixed costs of the project are estimated at $200,000 per year. The project is expected to have a 3-year life and a terminal value (excluding the operating cash flows in year 3) of $500,000. CWC has a 34% marginal tax rate. For the purposes of this project, working capital effects will be ignored. Bottled water targeted at children is expected to have different risk characteristics from the firm’s current products. Therefore, CWC has decided to use the “pure play” approach to evaluate this project. After researching the market, CWC managed to find two pure-play firms. The specifics for those two firms are: